Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

The cabinets for the upstairs space are designed and ready to be made, but we skidded to a slight halt when it came time to select the variety of wood. The old window trim and baseboards, which we’ve stripped, are made of heart pine (I know this thanks to you guys!) The grain is really beautiful, but heart pine is no longer widely available—and the more I look into it, the more I’m learning how prohibitively expensive this wood might be. We don’t have a huge amount of cabinets we’re having to build, but we do want them to look like they belong in the Building—not like slick new pieces of furniture. (And later, when we do the downstairs space, we’ll face the same decision about what wood to use.) (Candlelight Cabinetry) So I wanted to ask you what you think of quarter sawn oak. (Note: Don’t look at the stain color or finish; just the wood.) Quarter sawn oak is the wood used for most mission-style furniture and cabinetry from the arts and crafts period, and is known for its distinctive grain and durability. While the grain isn’t identical to that of the heart pine window trim, it has more of an old, classic look than lots of woods widely used for cabinets today. (Crown Point Cabinetry). Here’s an example of quarter sawn white oak in a kitchen. Of course, our cabinets won’t be Mission style, and they won’t be designed for a kitchen…but you get the idea of what quarter sawn white oak looks like. (Crown Point Cabinetry) This is a really helpful glimpse at the difference between quarter sawn oak (cabinets) and flat sawn oak (door trim.) I think the grain of the flat sawn oak (this is the oak widely used for cabinets, furniture, and trim) would be too strong and distracting to use for the cabinets throughout the office, but I also think using a wood that doesn’t have much grain (alder, for example) might be like when Richard reaches into his vest pocket in “Somewhere in Time” and pulls out a penny from 1979. I don’t want the cabinets to look sleek and modern, like they were made in this era. I want ’em to look like they’ve been in the building forever. Do any of you have any experience using quarter sawn oak for furniture or cabinets? Do you like it? Do you love it? Do you hate it? How about the price? Do you prefer quarter sawn white oak or quarter sawn red oak? And everyone else, would love to hear your thoughts, or even suggestions for other wood that might work. The cabinet guy will get started next week. Hope you’re having a wonderful week! Love, P-Dub
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Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

Rift Cut or Rift Sawn Oak is the most dimensionally stable cut out between Plain and Quarter Sawn Oak. Red Oak is typically used for Plain Sawn and Quarter Sawn Oak, but White Oak is used for a Rift Sawn Oak. Because of the way that Rift Sawn Oak is cut, it produces a unique linear appearance, without any of the flecking that a Quarter Sawn Oak would display. Rift Sawn Oak is the most costly out of the three types of cut oak, as it is the most labor intensive. Rift Sawn Oak can come in a number of stains and will darken or golden over time.
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Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

Straight grain oak, also known as rift sawn, can be either red or white oak. The straight grain appearance generally does not expose the ray flecks that are pronounced in quarter-sawn oak. In straight grain lumber, the growth ring orientation to the board surface is 30° to 60°, achieved when cuts are far from the center. The cuts produce a consistently beautiful straight grain. CliqStudios uses straight grain oak in our oak cabinets.Quarter sawn oak is produced when a log is split into quarters first, then boards are cut at a 60° to 90° diagonal from the center of the log out toward the edge, producing a vertical and uniform grain pattern. Quarter sawing produces “marks” on the face of the board, revealing distinctive stripes or (ray flecks) running across the grain, a signature of quarter sawn oak. Quarter sawn lumber is valued at a premium because of the amount of time and material involved.Plain sawn oak, the most common oak lumber in American cabinets, displays growth rings that are oriented less than 30° to the board surface. The distinct grain pattern (sometimes referred to as cathedral grain) is the least expensive cut. Sawn from the perimeter of the log, boards display growth rings nearly parallel with the surface. The coarser, more textured effect draws attention to the wood rather than the lines of the cabinet itself.
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Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

Quarter-sawn oak, red or white would be appropriate for the period of your building. Although, cabinets would have been more utilitarian in nature and fir might have been used. Display pieces and furniture had the more decorative quarter-sawn oak. I have quite of few pieces of antique furniture, sideboards, and chairs made with quarter=sawn oak. Also, our over 100 year home has the original quarter-sawn oak floors throughout.
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Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

Quarter sawn oak is produced when a log is split into quarters first, then boards are cut at a 60° to 90° diagonal from the center of the log out toward the edge, producing a vertical and uniform grain pattern. Quarter sawing produces “marks” on the face of the board, revealing distinctive stripes or (ray flecks) running across the grain, a signature of quarter sawn oak. Quarter sawn lumber is valued at a premium because of the amount of time and material involved.
quarter sawn oak kitchen cabinets 5

Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

This is a really helpful glimpse at the difference between quarter sawn oak (cabinets) and flat sawn oak (door trim.) I think the grain of the flat sawn oak (this is the oak widely used for cabinets, furniture, and trim) would be too strong and distracting to use for the cabinets throughout the office, but I also think using a wood that doesn’t have much grain (alder, for example) might be like when Richard reaches into his vest pocket in “Somewhere in Time” and pulls out a penny from 1979. I don’t want the cabinets to look sleek and modern, like they were made in this era. I want ’em to look like they’ve been in the building forever.
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Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

I absolutely LOVE quarter sawn oak!! it has a really distinctive, hard-working but warm look to it. I have an old quarter sawn rocking chair that i refinished in high school and re-upholstered the seat and back and it still looks great. Well, it’s time to re-upholster it again–red calico is not so popular now! We have many Amish furniture places around me (central Ohio) and there is a ton of beautiful quarter sawn pieces that i drool over when we browse the shops.
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Quarter Sawn Oak Kitchen Cabinets

Straight grain oak, also known as rift sawn, can be either red or white oak. The straight grain appearance generally does not expose the ray flecks that are pronounced in quarter-sawn oak. In straight grain lumber, the growth ring orientation to the board surface is 30° to 60°, achieved when cuts are far from the center. The cuts produce a consistently beautiful straight grain. CliqStudios uses straight grain oak in our oak cabinets.
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Here’s an example of quarter sawn white oak in a kitchen. Of course, our cabinets won’t be Mission style, and they won’t be designed for a kitchen…but you get the idea of what quarter sawn white oak looks like.
quarter sawn oak kitchen cabinets 9

So I wanted to ask you what you think of quarter sawn oak. (Note: Don’t look at the stain color or finish; just the wood.) Quarter sawn oak is the wood used for most mission-style furniture and cabinetry from the arts and crafts period, and is known for its distinctive grain and durability. While the grain isn’t identical to that of the heart pine window trim, it has more of an old, classic look than lots of woods widely used for cabinets today.
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Quarter sawn is definitely timeless and wears beautifully. I actually have a couple of Stickley pieces that are quarter sawn — white I think — and they hold their patina, but I will say ask about the finish because it does fade if in sun exposure. (Oak wood floors can fade too in sunlight, showing the outline of the rug if you had one.)
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Plain sawn oak, the most common oak lumber in American cabinets, displays growth rings that are oriented less than 30° to the board surface. The distinct grain pattern (sometimes referred to as cathedral grain) is the least expensive cut. Sawn from the perimeter of the log, boards display growth rings nearly parallel with the surface. The coarser, more textured effect draws attention to the wood rather than the lines of the cabinet itself.
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I would with the quarter sawn, def not the flat sawn. As well, when you are specifiying the cabinets you want to go with Premium Grade- not custum or economy. This mean that the doors and drawer fronts will be sequenced panel set so the grain, figure, and color looks more consistant together. Mainly you do not want the grain to be rotated for doors and drawers. (I can send you the illustration of this if you want)

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