How To Remove Hardwood Floor

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

Okay, so the fastest way to remove old hardwood floors is to cut the boards into smaller sections.  This is helpful because hardwood planks are all different lengths and make it really tough to remove quickly.  So cutting them into smaller pieces of wood, makes it easier to pry up.  So, using a Circular Saw (ours was a worm drive…..and it gave it some ooommph), cut lines into your hardwood, perpendicular to the direction the wood is laying.  And cut each section about 1-2 feet wide.
how to remove hardwood floor 1

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

A hardwood floor adds value to a home, but isn't always easy to clean. Wood floors, as opposed to tile, are softer and are easier to damage with cleaning solvents. Scuffs on a hardwood floor are common, whether they came from hard-soled shoes, kids or pets. You can remove them without resorting to abrasives that may damage your hardwoods.
how to remove hardwood floor 2

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

Hardwood flooring makes a welcome addition to any home, but it can be daunting to deal with once it’s time to remove or replace it. Stripping hardwood flooring the wrong way can cost you hours of backbreaking work, leave you with an enormous mess and even cause permanent damage to your subflooring. If you decide to remove your flooring yourself, it will be worth knowing how the see the project through safely and efficiently. Start by sawing the individual boards into more manageable sections, then pull them up using a pry bar. From there, you can simply dispose of the materials or repurpose them for other creative uses around your home.
how to remove hardwood floor 3

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

Tips Spare yourself the expense and inconvenience of hiring a contractor by removing your hardwood flooring yourself. Flooring removal projects may take several days. It’s a good idea to keep at least one major avenue clear so that you can get around your home as needed. Invest in an extension cord for your circular saw to ensure that it will span the length of the room. Sand down scratches, gouges and other imperfections on salvageable hardwood, then add a fresh coat of stain and lacquer. If you haven’t decided whether or not to reuse your hardwood flooring, it may help to sort the boards into two stacks: those that can be tossed and those in good enough shape to save.
how to remove hardwood floor 4

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

Spare yourself the expense and inconvenience of hiring a contractor by removing your hardwood flooring yourself. Flooring removal projects may take several days. It’s a good idea to keep at least one major avenue clear so that you can get around your home as needed. Invest in an extension cord for your circular saw to ensure that it will span the length of the room. Sand down scratches, gouges and other imperfections on salvageable hardwood, then add a fresh coat of stain and lacquer. If you haven’t decided whether or not to reuse your hardwood flooring, it may help to sort the boards into two stacks: those that can be tossed and those in good enough shape to save.
how to remove hardwood floor 5

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

Once a starting area is chiseled out it’s all about the brute force this machine produces. It’s a little slow to start, but once it creates an opening and it can get at the hardwood in a perpendicular direction, say goodnight Irene to this solid hardwood glue down. It won’t happen all the time, but the glue was coming up with the hardwood, cutting more time on this job in getting a clean glue free surface for the re-installation.
how to remove hardwood floor 6

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

How do I get rid of foot prints on my hardwood floor? I can just clean them and as soon as I do and walk on them, there are a lot of foot prints. I use Bruce hardwood floor cleaner on them, because my floors are Bruce.
how to remove hardwood floor 7

How To Remove Hardwood Floor

Cut one board in half lengthwise. If your hardwood flooring is still in good condition, you may decide that it’s worth keeping and putting to use elsewhere. To successfully salvage hardwood, you’ll need to first saw one board straight down the middle along its length. After tearing out both halves of this board, you’ll have a sufficient amount of space to begin working on the others. It may be necessary to sacrifice one or two boards to put you in a position to remove the others. Dig out a central board and work outward in both directions.
how to remove hardwood floor 8

The numbers came in like this; 85 total man hours to remove hardwood and adhesive that was left behind. The figure in your case could be higher or lower. In general, expect about ten square feet per hour working at a good pace. This includes complete removal with a smooth, clean concrete slab ready for re-installation of a new floor.
how to remove hardwood floor 9

We decided after moving into our home, that the floors on the main level needed some love.  There was a mixture of hardwood and old carpet (about half and half).  The old carpet really had to go (do you ever imagine who/what has been on old matted carpet?? it’s not a good place for your brain to go…) and the hardwood had us stumped.  We considered keeping it and sanding/re-staining or just adding more wood and staining it a color that closely matched the already existing wood.  But, we ultimately wanted a completely different plank of wood.  So, it seemed crazy to put money into re-staining the old wood or trying to match it……when we didn’t really like it.  So, we decided to tear it out.
how to remove hardwood floor 10

How to Remove Wood Flooring in 3 Easy StepsOld-growth wood—typically, Douglas fir, oak and maple—has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won’t find at a big-box store. Most Popular Author Copy Created with Sketch. By Alex Hutchinson Nov 29, 2007 Old-growth wood–typically, Douglas fir, oak and maple–has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won’t find at a big-box store. Salvaging it from an old home takes time but saves money; boards wider than the standard 2 1/4-in. strips are particularly valuable.Step 1 Most PopularPry up the first few boards to give yourself room to work. Alternatively, use a circular saw with a carbide-tooth blade to make a plunge cut along the length of the sacrificial board and use a pry bar to tear it out.Step 2 Working from the tongue side, use a pry bar to gently lift the adjacent board up and out in the direction of the nail in order to avoid breaking off the groove. Work your way down the length of the board with the pry bar, rather than trying to remove it in one go.Step 3 Pull any remaining nails from the salvaged wood using large locking pliers, then carefully patrol the subfloor and extract nail stubs. Renail any floor sections that have been damaged by the salvage process.Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowMore from Popular Mechanics:
how to remove hardwood floor 11

Hardwood floors add class and elegance to any home, and if properly maintained they can last for many years. An inevitable part of the maintenance is stain removal. When dealt with early enough, most stains can be eliminated. The trick is to know which removal method to use for which kind of stain. Regardless, your first step is the same: sweep the floor.
how to remove hardwood floor 12

Most Popular Author Copy Created with Sketch. By Alex Hutchinson Nov 29, 2007 Old-growth wood–typically, Douglas fir, oak and maple–has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won’t find at a big-box store. Salvaging it from an old home takes time but saves money; boards wider than the standard 2 1/4-in. strips are particularly valuable.Step 1 Most PopularPry up the first few boards to give yourself room to work. Alternatively, use a circular saw with a carbide-tooth blade to make a plunge cut along the length of the sacrificial board and use a pry bar to tear it out.Step 2 Working from the tongue side, use a pry bar to gently lift the adjacent board up and out in the direction of the nail in order to avoid breaking off the groove. Work your way down the length of the board with the pry bar, rather than trying to remove it in one go.Step 3 Pull any remaining nails from the salvaged wood using large locking pliers, then carefully patrol the subfloor and extract nail stubs. Renail any floor sections that have been damaged by the salvage process.Advertisement – Continue Reading Below
how to remove hardwood floor 13

Author Copy Created with Sketch. By Alex Hutchinson Nov 29, 2007 Old-growth wood–typically, Douglas fir, oak and maple–has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won’t find at a big-box store. Salvaging it from an old home takes time but saves money; boards wider than the standard 2 1/4-in. strips are particularly valuable.Step 1 Most PopularPry up the first few boards to give yourself room to work. Alternatively, use a circular saw with a carbide-tooth blade to make a plunge cut along the length of the sacrificial board and use a pry bar to tear it out.Step 2 Working from the tongue side, use a pry bar to gently lift the adjacent board up and out in the direction of the nail in order to avoid breaking off the groove. Work your way down the length of the board with the pry bar, rather than trying to remove it in one go.Step 3 Pull any remaining nails from the salvaged wood using large locking pliers, then carefully patrol the subfloor and extract nail stubs. Renail any floor sections that have been damaged by the salvage process.Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *