Central Kitchen Sf

Central Kitchen Sf

central kitchen 2.0 – a letter from chef thomas mcnaughtonJuly 6, 2016 Dear Friends, The old Central Kitchen will close its doors on July 9th 2016. The new Central Kitchen will open to the public on July 21st. Doing a standard press release for this great evolution of our restaurant did not make sense to me. A letter to our community, friends and family did. I love Central Kitchen right now. We have a busy space, outstanding food and I am so proud of what we put out every service. That said, the crazy momentum of a busy restaurant, open every day, makes it hard to implement changes, let alone the major overhaul we have been thinking about for some time now. It has always been our goal to be an accessible, neighborhood restaurant along the 20th street corridor but to some we are still perceived as a higher end restaurant, and that has never felt right to me. I want to make a clear statement of what Central kitchen will be. The remodel starts with the kitchen redesign, which will allow for both stylistic changes in the food as well as a greatly increased efficiency, and I have to admit, a few new fun things to play with. The beginning of the new menu is comprised of our love for all things raw, cured, fermented and smoked coming from our shared larder and Salumeria’s cure box. Next, we will have a section celebrating the amazing vegetables our farmers are growing. There will be an expanded pasta and bread program created in flour + water’s dough room just a block away. The end of the menu will focus on meats and fish prepared in our new wood burning hearth. Our menu will list all items as sharable and communal. The meats and fish coming from the hearth, as well as simple crudos and vegetables, will honor the amazing, local products from the Bay Area. We will offer more options for people to enjoy, both smaller plates and large format dishes. The kitchen remodel will also allow us to greatly improve our ability to feed our two private dining rooms: The Upstairs and The Butcher Block. Since the opening of Central Kitchen, the private dining rooms have added 55 seats to the already existing restaurant. I am thrilled to have the freedom to start from scratch with this new menu and focus ultimately on the things I crave and want to eat. Central Kitchen will be a welcoming gathering place that is more connected to the neighborhood than ever before. Thank you for your continued support of not only me and Central Kitchen, but also for the Ne Timeas Restaurant Group family. Hope to see you soon, Thomas McNaughton Chef/Partner
central kitchen sf 1

Central Kitchen Sf

The entryway to Central Kitchen. Dipesh G./Yelp Central Kitchen is just about over its two-week remodel, during which time it made overdue physical changes to the restaurant, like upgrade the bathrooms, redo the entryway, paint the walls, get new tables, and remodel the kitchen. Chef/owner Thomas McNaughton called the changes necessary to evolving Central Kitchen into its best self, so not only did the physical appearance alter, but the menu and concept for the food did, too. Whereas the food before was pretty limited with just a few snacks, starters, pastas, and entrees, now it’s a much larger menu with distinct sections for raw, fermented, and cured food, vegetables, pasta, hearth items, and large-format dishes (for the change-averse out there, some dishes are from the old menu or have appeared on the old menu, so not everything is completely different). You can see it in full below. McNaughton was able to expand the menu because of the kitchen redesigns. “So much about it is strategy and how to be able to execute and execute and execute. For instance, the old menu had two pastas, and it was such a struggle to do even those because we didn’t have a pasta cooker installed,” McNaughton explained. “Now, we have five on the menu and with a pasta cooker and the ranges we built around it, those five pastas will be easier to execute than the two we had one before.” “The way I approached the new menu was us sitting down and saying, ‘What do we want to eat?'” The biggest change is the move away from the traditional appetizer and entree. Now, all items are priced lower with slightly smaller portions meant to be shared — a common SF practice these days. “The old menu was so constrictive. The way I approached the new menu was us sitting down and saying, ‘What do we want to eat?’” McNaughton told Eater. “That selfish standpoint also speaks to the populus of not only our employees but also the neighborhood and the community of San Francisco.” With that in mind, McNaughton designed the menu so that everything could be mixed and matched, or stand on their own should that be the route you want to go. Dishes will also change on a weekly or even daily basis, with things like a whole fried rock cod subbing in for a large-format plate. Finally, the last change is that 30 to 40 percent of tables will now be held for walk-ins, whereas the restaurant was nearly all reservation-only before. Central Kitchen 2.0 (re)opens Thursday, July 21, with slightly more limited seating at first while the restaurant gets back on its feet. Foursquare OpenTable Central Kitchen 3000 20th Street, San Francisco, CA 94110 415 826 7004 Via: Central Kitchen to Close for Two Week Menu and Space Makeover More From Eater SF The Sandwich Spot Calls It Quits and Other Bay Area Closings San Jose’s Newest Boba Café Will Make Instagrammers’ Heads Explode Boxing Room Will Swap Cajun Food for Spanish Cuisine 10 Last-Minute Mother’s Day Reservations You Can Still Make to Redeem Yourself Steph Curry Played a Mean Jazz Tambourine at Black Cat Last Night, and More A.M. Intel Ogle the Menu of Chris Cosentino’s New Wine Country Outpost in Las Alcobas Hotel
central kitchen sf 2

Central Kitchen Sf

Central Kitchen is just about over its two-week remodel, during which time it made overdue physical changes to the restaurant, like upgrade the bathrooms, redo the entryway, paint the walls, get new tables, and remodel the kitchen. Chef/owner Thomas McNaughton called the changes necessary to evolving Central Kitchen into its best self, so not only did the physical appearance alter, but the menu and concept for the food did, too. Whereas the food before was pretty limited with just a few snacks, starters, pastas, and entrees, now it’s a much larger menu with distinct sections for raw, fermented, and cured food, vegetables, pasta, hearth items, and large-format dishes (for the change-averse out there, some dishes are from the old menu or have appeared on the old menu, so not everything is completely different). You can see it in full below. McNaughton was able to expand the menu because of the kitchen redesigns. “So much about it is strategy and how to be able to execute and execute and execute. For instance, the old menu had two pastas, and it was such a struggle to do even those because we didn’t have a pasta cooker installed,” McNaughton explained. “Now, we have five on the menu and with a pasta cooker and the ranges we built around it, those five pastas will be easier to execute than the two we had one before.” “The way I approached the new menu was us sitting down and saying, ‘What do we want to eat?'” The biggest change is the move away from the traditional appetizer and entree. Now, all items are priced lower with slightly smaller portions meant to be shared — a common SF practice these days. “The old menu was so constrictive. The way I approached the new menu was us sitting down and saying, ‘What do we want to eat?’” McNaughton told Eater. “That selfish standpoint also speaks to the populus of not only our employees but also the neighborhood and the community of San Francisco.” With that in mind, McNaughton designed the menu so that everything could be mixed and matched, or stand on their own should that be the route you want to go. Dishes will also change on a weekly or even daily basis, with things like a whole fried rock cod subbing in for a large-format plate. Finally, the last change is that 30 to 40 percent of tables will now be held for walk-ins, whereas the restaurant was nearly all reservation-only before. Central Kitchen 2.0 (re)opens Thursday, July 21, with slightly more limited seating at first while the restaurant gets back on its feet. Foursquare OpenTable Central Kitchen 3000 20th Street, San Francisco, CA 94110 415 826 7004
central kitchen sf 3

Central Kitchen Sf

Central Kitchen is just about over its two-week remodel, during which time it made overdue physical changes to the restaurant, like upgrade the bathrooms, redo the entryway, paint the walls, get new tables, and remodel the kitchen. Chef/owner Thomas McNaughton called the changes necessary to evolving Central Kitchen into its best self, so not only did the physical appearance alter, but the menu and concept for the food did, too.

Central Kitchen Sf

Central Kitchen Sf
Central Kitchen Sf
Central Kitchen Sf

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